Here are the 46 performance measures the world’s cities will be judged by

How good or bad of a job are cities doing serving their citizens? Cities haven’t always collected much data on such matters. And when they have, they’ve tended to use widely different indicators to measure their performance, making comparisons across countries, continents and cultures nearly impossible. 

As Citiscope reported this week, the Geneva-based International Organization for Standardization has issued a new standard for cities to follow in their data collection. Compliance with this new standard, known as ISO 37120, is not mandatory for any city. But cities that do participate will have new ways to compare themselves with peer cities around the globe. Below are the 46 performance indicators that participating cities will need to track. 


Economy

  • City’s unemployment rate
  • Assessed value of commercial and industrial properties as a percentage of total assessed value of all properties
  • Percentage of city population living in poverty

 

Education

  • Percentage of female school-aged population enrolled in school
  • Percentage of students completing primary education
  • Percentage of students completing secondary education
  • Primary education student/teacher ratio

 

Energy

  • Total residential electrical use per capita (kWh/year)
  • Percentage of city population with authorized electrical service
  • Energy consumption of public buildings per year (kWh/m2)
  • Percentage of total energy derived from renewable sources, as a share of the city’s total energy consumption

 

Environment

  • Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration
  • Particulate matter (PM10) concentration
  • Greenhouse gas emissions measured in tonnes per capita

 

Finance

  • Debt service ratio (debt service expenditure as a percent of a municipality’s own-source revenue)

 

​​Fire and emergency response

  • Number of firefighters per 100 000 population
  • Number of fire related deaths per 100 000 population
  • Number of natural disaster-related deaths per 100 000 population 

 

Governance

  • Voter participation in last municipal election (as a percentage of eligible voters)
  • Women as a percentage of total elected to city-level office

 

Health

  • Average life expectancy
  • Number of in-patient hospital beds per 100 000 population
  • Number of physicians per 100 000 population
  • Under age five mortality per 1 000 live births

 

Safety

  • Number of police officers per 100 000 population
  • Number of homicides per 100 000 population

 

Shelter 

  • Percentage of city population living in slums

 

Solid waste

  • Percentage of city population with regular solid waste collection (residential)
  • Total collected municipal solid waste per capita
  • Percentage of city’s solid waste that is recycled

 

Telecommunication and Innovation

  • Number of internet connections per 100 000 population
  • Number of cell phone connections per 100 000 population

 

Transportation

  • Km of high capacity public transport system per 100 000 population
  • Km of light passenger transport system per 100 000 population
  • Annual number of public transport trips per capita
  • Number of personal automobiles per capita

 

Urban Planning

  • Green area (hectares) per 100 000 population

 

Wastewater

  • Percentage of city population served by wastewater collection
  • Percentage of the city’s wastewater that has received no treatment
  • Percentage of the city’s wastewater receiving primary treatment
  • Percentage of the city’s wastewater receiving secondary treatment
  • Percentage of the city’s wastewater receiving tertiary treatment

 

Water and Sanitation

  • Percentage of city population with potable water supply service
  • Percentage of city population with sustainable access to an improved water source
  • Percentage of population with access to improved sanitation
  • Total domestic water consumption per capita (litres/day)

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Join Citiscope, Meeting of the Minds and the World Council on City Data for a webinar November 11 on the new data standard for global city performance. Learn how Boston, London and Buenos Aires are implementing and using the standard. Register here.

 
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