CitiSignals

Top urban news, trends and reports curated for the world’s city leaders. Edited by David Hatch

Cooking up creative ways to salvage unwanted food

Ugly produce can be hard to sell but tastes just fine. (amophoto_au/Shutterstock.com)

From deploying community refrigerators to repurposing unwanted produce, cities across the world are employing inventive strategies to minimize food waste. Alexander Starritt writes for Apolitical that city leaders and entrepreneurs aim to take a bite out of the estimated 1.3 billion tons of food tossed away annually. The article is the second in a series of ten to appear on Fast Company.

In Leeds, England, local supermarkets donate enough unsold — but still edible — food daily to provide 600 underprivileged students with free breakfast and lunch, the article says. Galdakao, Spain is one of several cities across Europe with community fridges where leftovers can be given away rather than trashed.

Some municipalities have found new purposes for stale food. In Bordeaux, France, Les Confitures de Dominique turns outdated produce into jam, chutney and soup, Starritt reports. Toast Ale in London collects bread scraps that it uses to brew beer.

As highlighted by Citiscope, the WeFood supermarket in Copenhagen sells expired, damaged and blemished products at steep discounts. Meanwhile, France and Italy have passed laws designed to prevent cities from throwing away expired food.

Source: 
Apolitical

More from Citiscope

Latest Innovation Feature

Latest CitiSignal

This story is tagged under: 

Comments Policy

Citiscope is a place for the world’s urban leaders — mayors, councils, business, civic, neighborhood and independent observers — to exchange ideas and learn from each other. Comments are most welcome. Participants must first sign in to Disqus. (Not registered? It’s easy: Sign up here or connect with a social media account.) We ask that you use your real first and last names and say what city you’re from. Comments that do not follow Citiscope’s comments policy will be removed.